PASO ROBLES HOT SPRINGS

 

The Hot Springs in Paso Robles are located in the coastal mountain range of central California.

The original inhabitants of the area are the Salinan Indians and records show human and animal

life far before recorded time...stories of the Grizzly Bears that at times would control the springs.

 

The ancient people, the Salinan Indians, people from the gold rush days, cowboys, travelers,

missionaries, miners, settlers, Mexican people to a famous piano player statesman, sport

stars, Hollywood actors and more have tested their healing waters...known to be some

of the most healing on earth giving liberation from various diseases including psoriasis,

arthritis, and many other ailments found in the healing waters and comforting mud baths.

 

 

CIRCA: 1905 THE MUNICIPAL BATH HOUSE WITH MUD BATHS

THE  BATH HOUSE AT 840 PINE St. On the conner of  11th St.

 

NO SIGN OF HEALING SPRINGS... NOW A CANDY STORE

 

SPRING STREET led to the Springs...a historic Indian trail, a  road, and highway

Spring Street at 3rd looking North toward the town in 1900

Spring Street was once a ancient trail that came up from the ocean

where Native Americans of the Salinas and Chumash tribes had

settled the area around North County and the Salinas River Valley

for tens of thousands of years...later called:

 

Old Spanish Mission Trail

El Camino Real

The Royal Highway

The Kings Highway

California Mission Trail

Spring Street

The 101

 

THE ROAD ACTUALLY FOLLOWS PART OF THE

SAN ANDREAS FAULT, and the S&P railroad was

built in segments in the 1870's and 1880's

following the great El Camino Real.

 

THEY PAVED PARADISE AND PUT UP A PARKING LOT...

 

In the Springs Bath House on Spring Street the pool above was known as a plunge.

This is the Springs Bath House on Spring Street that stood where the

sink hole was formed from the 2002 Earthquake...just to the left where

the field and small trees is now where the City Library and the City

Offices stand, and where this building stood is the parking lot...

 

 

Another picture of the Bath House on Spring Street that stood where the

sink hole was formed from the 2003 Earthquake...

The U.S. Geological Survey mapping shows that both Spring

St. and a string of springs are aligned along the Rinconada

fault,on which the town sits.

 

The bathhouse was erected over the sulphur spring in 1888, with a

plunge and thirty-seven bath rooms. In the following year, work began

on the large Hot Springs Hotel, (today the Paso Robles Inn), which

was completed in 1900 and burned down 40 years later.

 

I am doing further research on the fire, interesting that the Paso

Robles Inn also burned down...I'm just saying...I got thoughts

swirling in my head and know I need some more research.

 

Since the privileges of using the baths were restricted to guests of

the hotel and many sufferers of the ailments the baths cured could

not pay the rates of the fashionable hotel, a few businessmen in

Paso Robles made arrangements with Felix Liss for the right to

bore for sulphur water on a lot which Liss owned.  A sulphur well

was reached, a bath house built and baths offered at an affordable

rate of twenty-five cents. The establishment was later offered to the

City and is currently the site

of the Municipal Pool.

 

 

The large building on the left in the picture is the Paso Robles Inn.  On the right of the pic near center is the Bath House on Spring in the Picture above, and that happens to be the location of the sink hole that the 2003 Earthquake caused right behind the Paso Robles City Hall and Library.  

 

My research shows that this was the actual site of the ancient site that was the original prehistoric trail cut by the local tribes

and animals that roamed the oak forests for tens of thousands

of years...

 

Imagine that all the area that you see in the pic was a deep forest of great hundred year old oaks that great so well in the area due to the water that was part of the geography of this area of the San Andres Fault.

 

 

SEE MORE ON THE HOT SPRINGS COVER UP

 

 

The following is quoted from THE HISTORY OF THE PASO ROBLES INN: MORE THAN A CENTURY OF PRIDE By Ann Martin Bowler:

 

For many centuries hot mineral water bubbled up from the earth, foaming and steaming in what is now the center of Paso Robles, giving

both comfort and cure so much they named the area, "Heaven's Spot."  So many Indians (for centuries) used the hot springs that a well-

trodden trail passed right by it...they called the area "Hot Springs." 

 

I have discovered a number of locations around Paso and on the River that ot only were there the mud baths, there were Iron Springs and

the Sand Springs, which bubbles through the sand and was said to produce delightful sensations, it is reported that some of the hot springs

that are located near the intersection of the 101 and Spring St. near the River...

 

In 1882, Drury James and the Blackburn brothers issued a pamphlet advertising "El Paso de Robles Hot and Cold Sulphur Springs and the

Only Natural Mud Baths in the World."  By then there were first class accomodations--a reading room, barber shop, and telegraph office; a

general store, a top-of-the-line livery stable, and comfortably furnished cottages for families that preferred privacy to quarters in the hotel.

Visitors could stay in touch with the rest of the world, as there were two daily mails, a Western Union Telegraph office, and a Wells Fargo

agency with special rates for guests.  As the springs became more and more a destination the well-to-do began to travel more to the area.

 

 

Jonie Mitchell -- Big Yellow Taxie, better known as They Paved

Paradise and put up a parking lot... I dedicate this to the original

Hot Sulphur Springs on Spring Street...and the stories untold.

The artesian springs flowed strong from the subterreanean

river than runs from the Yellowstone Park to the ocean...

hitting a granate uplife of the San Adrews Fault and breaks

ground at this ancient spot on earth and became home for

the Salinan Indians for tens of thousands of years...

 

 

1883 history of the Hot Springs at the North end of Spring Street, near where now it intersects with the 101 and the Salinas River.  Surveys indicate the mud and hot springs average 116 degree, ranging as high as 140.  A guy name Woodworth, who at one time owned the 28 acres said there were over 8 different "waters" containing concentrations of calcium, lithium, bicarbonate soda, iron chelate, white and black sulfur, gold ionized and a number of other minerals.  There were even some hot sand springs in the river bed.

 

It was said, "The spring was 'the most wonderful beautifier of the complexion in the world."

 

Ignacy Jan PADEREWSKI (1860-1941)

Brought music and wine to the area...

Paderewski came in 1913 to visit the hot mud and sulfur

water baths to relieve his rheumatism. The pianist pur-

chased what was to become Rancho San Ignacio,

2800 acres of sprawling hills, upon which he planted

walnut, almond and plum trees. In 1922 he planted

200 acres of zinfandel and petit syrah grapes.

"We are certain, however, that Salinan Indians used the hot springs long before recorded history, referring to it as "Heavens Spot" because of the curative powers of the sulfur springs...In 1813, Padre Juan Cabot also had a rough shelter built over the hot springs.  Located on the corner of what is now 10th and Spring Street (Library Parking lot)."

 

The famous mud baths, located 2.5 miles north of the main spring were actually two springs.  The springs collectively flowed at 144,000 gallons per day with temperatures of 122 degrees and 140 degrees respectively.  Near the mud baths were two more springs; the soda spring 200 feet to the north and the sulfur spring to the south both had temperature of around 77 degrees.

 

The sand spring, located one half mile south of the mud springs in the riverbed, had a temperature of 148 degrees.  It was said that at this spring, "the hot water boiled up with such force that a submerged bather was quickly forced to the surface."

THE HISTORY OF THE PASO ROBLES INN:

MORE THAN A CENTURY OF PRIDE

By Ann Martin Bowler:

THIS IS WHY THE TOWN'S HERE

Springs as in Spring Street

2.5 million gallons of water in 24 hours flowed

from some of the Artesian hot sulfur springs 

 

The bathhouse was erected over the sulphur spring in 1888, with a plunge and thirty-seven bath rooms. In the following year, work began on the large Hot Springs Hotel, (today the Paso Robles Inn), which was completed in 1900 and burned down 40 years later. Since the privileges of using the baths were restricted to guests of the hotel and many sufferers of the ailments the baths cured could not pay the rates of the fashionable hotel, a few businessmen in Paso Robles made arrangements with Felix Liss for the right to bore for sulphur water on a lot which Liss owned. A sulphur well was reached, a bath house built and baths offered at an affordable rate of twenty-five cents. The establishment was later offered to the City and is currently the site of the Municipal Pool."

 

 

Early days before the Paso Robles Inn was built, building to the right was the hot springs and the cabins

 to the left is where later the Paso Robles Inn was built...the dirt road is Spring Street.

 

 

 

Paso Robles Inn built in 1900

Paso Robles Inn today on Spring street

 

 

 

At Santa Ysabel, located three miles south of Paso Robles on South River Road, there

were 5 hot springs.  The largest, a warm sulfur spring, had a temperature of  96 degree

Sink hole behind the Paso Robles Libray that was formed when

the earth shook in Paso Robles in 2002

 

HOT SPRINGS COVER UP

 

 

 

PASO ROBLES HOT SPRINGS ON THE
ROAD OF A THOUSAND WONDERS


This bath-house is in the forest of oaks with a
covered way to the home-like hotel.  There is
nothing in Europe any better, and there is no

water in Europe any better.

Long words of six and seven syllables tell the
ways it has, the whys and wherefores, of mak-

ing you over. But chiefly they can be reduced
to water, hot water, and some mud hot mud.

They are unequaled anywhere in the world.

Electric baths, vapor baths, solar baths, hot air baths, ice pack baths, tub baths, plunge baths

hot sand, bottle water, medicine doctors, massage thearpy but always hot water and mud.

 

 

 

Hot springs in Paso Robles used to enjoy a more genial reputation. In the early 1800s, padres from nearby Mission San Miguel relaxed in them. On the mend

from gunshot wounds, the desperado Jesse James dipped into the baths to speed his healing. Ignacy Paderewski, the great pianist and a former prime minister of Poland, swore by the hot Paso Robles mud for the arthritis in his hands.  He eventually became a major landowner in the area and is honored today in the city's annual Paderewski Festival.

 

Spring Street (the 101) and 13 which at the time was Highway 41

 

 

PASO & PINE

STREET SALOON

 

THE JAMES GANG

 

HOT SPRINGS COVER UP

 

SALINAN PEOPLE

 

Click here for more.

PineStreetSaloon.com

 

PIONEER TROUBADOURS

50% of Hosting for your Website at GoDaddy.com!